null
o

Equipped with a shovel and a winter’s worth of research, Duluth Wayforger™ Emily steps outside the gardener’s cottage at Glensheen Mansion and prepares to make history. The 12-acre Glensheen estate is listed on the US Historical Registry, and, as head gardener, Emily has made it her ongoing mission to re-create the property’s original landscape architecture.


Achieving turn-of-the-century accuracy takes epic amounts of weeding and grunt work – and equal amounts of study and detective work. Emily digs into century-old maps, correspondence about the grounds and archival photos in search of suitable plant varieties and design inspiration. “It’s a mix of science and craft, history and art,” she says. “I love every minute of it.”


Tapping into traditional methods from the era, Emily’s grafting two worlds together – then and now – and turning them into something incredible. Heirloom roses and other plants popular in the last century can be difficult to acquire, and it’s not uncommon to be on a waiting list for years for some varieties. But it’s this dedication and vision that assure visitors will continue to come from all over the world to admire the fruits of her labor.

For head gardener Emily, tending a historical landmark is part history lesson, part long-term planning and a whole lot of elbow grease.

For head gardener Emily, tending a historical landmark is part history lesson, part long-term planning and a whole lot of elbow grease.