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Erica, who has owned a successful metal fabricating business for the last 20 years, recently downsized her craft. The metalworker, who had been creating handrails, furniture and sculpture for architects, turned to more intimate pieces, such as her line of serving utensils.

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“As I got older, I started to work smaller,” says Erica, who also downsized her studio, moving from Boston to a beautiful barn in Waldoboro, Maine. 


Each of Erica’s spoons, scoops and other utensils is crafted with care and meant to forge connection. “With handmade items, you can see the dent of the metal being hit with a hammer, and that helps you envision the person who made it,” says Erica.

“I’m trying to tap into something that’s intimate, something people are going to use in daily rituals, like cooking or coffee making.”

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Working with materials like brass, steel and copper, Erica designs pieces to be used every day – to elevate those day-to-day moments and create a sense of intimacy. “Food is such an intimate thing,” she says. “The more I started working with utensils, the more I realized they touch on things that are important for all of us.” Things like friends, family and tradition.


Equally important to Erica? Giving back. She donates a portion of her sales to local food banks and other causes. So while she’s creating serving ware, she’s also serving her community, forging those connections she loves.

A professional metalworker for 25 years, Erica designs custom hardware and her own line of serving ware. Her goal? To create handmade objects that forge connections and elevate everyday moments.

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A professional metalworker for 25 years, Erica designs custom hardware and her own line of serving ware. Her goal? To create handmade objects that forge connections and elevate everyday moments.

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